Passport Health Plan and March of Dimes Donate Diaper Bags to Families with Babies in UofL Hospital NICU

As part of National Prematurity Awareness Month, Passport Health Plan and March of Dimes are stepping up to help families who have babies being treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Louisville Hospital.

Passport (the provider-sponsored, nonprofit, community-based health plan administering Medicaid benefits to more than 310,000 Kentuckians) and March of Dimes (the nation’s leading maternal and infant health nonprofit) are donating fully stocked diaper bags to help families during one of the most emotional and tense times in their lives.

“The preterm birth rate in the United States is on the rise for the third year in a row, a trend signaling an urgent health crisis for moms and babies,” says Passport CEO Mark Carter. “Passport and March of Dimes share a common goal – to work towards a day when every baby born in Kentucky arrives full-term and completely healthy.”

In Jefferson County, the preterm birth rate is an alarming 10.9 percent, based on 2016 data.

“Passport is proud to work with the March of Dimes to help promote healthy pregnancies and babies,” says Passport Chief Medical Officer Dr. Stephen Houghland. “Through this collaboration, we strive to prevent premature birth and birth defects, educating moms and supporting families in need.”

To read more, please click here.

 

Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book shows where progress is being made or still needed

The 2018 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book offers the latest data on 17 measures of child well-being, showing whether outcomes for children across the commonwealth have improved, worsened, or stayed the same over a five-year period.

Detailed data is available for every Kentucky county at www.kyyouth.org/kentucky-kids-count/.

“Core to our mission, we believe that children of every background and in every part of Kentucky deserve all the tools and opportunities that we as a commonwealth can provide. This book serves as an annual report card for how we are meeting that charge for all of our kids,” said Dr. Terry Brooks, executive director of Kentucky Youth Advocates.

The 2018 County Data Book allows users to investigate areas in which Kentucky and its counties are making progress and those needing focused attention for improvement. It highlights data in four domains of child well-being: economic security, education, health, and family and community.

The 2018 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book was made possible with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the 2018 KIDS COUNT sponsors: Passport Health Plan, Kosair Charities®, and Delta Dental of Kentucky.

 

Passport and March of Dimes donate 50 diaper bags to families with babies in UofL Hospital NICU

As part of National Prematurity Awareness Month, Passport Health Plan and March of Dimes are stepping up to help 50 families who have babies being treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Louisville Hospital.

Passport (the provider-sponsored, nonprofit, community-based health plan administering Medicaid benefits to more than 310,000 Kentuckians) and March of Dimes (the nation’s leading maternal and infant health nonprofit) are donating 50 fully stocked diaper bags to help families during one of the most emotional and tense times in their lives.

The preterm birth rate in the United States is on the rise for the third year in a row, a trend signaling an urgent health crisis for moms and babies, March of Dimes says. In Jefferson County, the preterm birth rate is an alarming 10.9 percent, based on 2016 data. Premature birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) is the largest contributor to infant death in the United States and around the world.

The official donation will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, November 17 (World Prematurity Day) at UofL Hospital, 530 South Jackson Street. Members of the news media are invited to attend. Officials from Passport, March of Dimes, and UofL Hospital will be available for comment.

For more about March of Dimes, go online to marchofdimes.org or nacersano.org.

 

University of Louisville professor thinks trees could help improve region’s health

Blame for Louisville’s high incidence of heart disease has long been attributed to a population that has unhealthy eating habits, a high rate of smoking, and an overall lack of exercise. In some circles, the city’s reputation has earned it an unwelcome nickname — Coronary Valley.

Dr. Aruni Bhatnager

But a new idea called “The Green Heart Program” seeks to determine if the simple presence of trees and more green spaces can improve overall health and lower the region’s rate of heart disease.

“We are testing the idea that if you increase green spaces in an urban community, you will see improvements in health,” Dr. Aruni Bhatnager, a University of Louisville professor of medicine who is leading the study, said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville.

Dr. Bhatnager said the study will enroll 700 people living in south Louisville neighborhoods and measure their risk for heart disease. The project will then plant nearly 10,000 large mature trees in those areas, then go back later to see if the presence of green affects the health of the community.

To hear more from Dr. Bhatnager, please click here. To learn more about the Green Heart project, please click here.

Nominate someone for a 2019 Commitment to Compassion Award

Compassion is more than just being sympathetic. Compassion means acting on the desire to alleviate the suffering of another. Those in the health care field seem to have an extra sense of compassion for those who need help in overcoming challenges.

Compassionate LouisvilleThe Commitment to Compassion Award was created to honor some of the people every year who exemplify true compassion in care delivery. It all began three years ago, when Jill Bell, vice president and chief communications and marketing officer at Passport Health Plan, and Stephanie Barnett of ChooseWell Communities, along with members of the staff at Insider Louisville, came up with the idea of honoring health care professionals who show extraordinary compassion in their approach to their work and their life.

The awards are given out each year at the Commitment to Compassion luncheon. The fourth annual luncheon will be held at the Muhammad Ali Center in Downtown Louisville on Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019.

Do you know someone who deserves recognition for what he or she does to improve the lives of those around them? Somebody who inspires and challenges you to become more compassionate yourself? Click here to nominate a compassionate honoree today. The deadline for award nominations is Friday, Dec. 21.

 

Interior design workshop will help high school students learn more about spaces that promote health and well-being

Passport and the International Interior Design Association (IIDA) are presenting a special interior design workshop devoted to encouraging, inspiring, and informing high school students about the field of Interior Design.

The workshop — which takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20, at Louisville Central Community Center (LCCC), 1300 Muhammad Ali Blvd. — will provide young people access to knowledgeable professionals and local universities who offer an Interior Design Major. Information regarding the Governor’s School for the Arts (GSA) will also be available.

During the event, students will take part in a mini-trade show and a design charrette emphasizing spaces that promote health and well-being.

Universities that will be represented include the University of Louisville, Sullivan University’s College of Technology & Design, Western Kentucky University, and the University of Kentucky. Vendors that will be taking part in the mini Trade Show include Shaw (Commercial Carpet and Hard Surface), Wilsonart (Laminate and Solid Surface), PPG (Paint), Patcraft (Commercial Carpet and Hard Surface), Louisville Tile (Wall & Floor Tile), and Koroseal (wall covering).

For more information or to register, please click here. To learn more about the Ohio/Kentucky Chapter of IIDA, please click here.

 

Symposium will help primary care practitioners learn more about detection and prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease

In an effort to help primary care practitioners (PCPs) and other healthcare professionals learn more about Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), the National Kidney Foundation, with the support of Passport Health Plan, is presenting “CKDinform: Early Detection and Prevention Symposium” from 7:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, October 20, at the Marriott Louisville East. ***UPDATE: This event is being rescheduled until early 2019 — stay tuned for more details, or email alana.miller@kidney.org.***

CKDinform is a collection of evidence-based resources provided in a diverse “toolbox” that will enable them to recognize CKD earlier and develop treatment protocols to slow progression.

Physicians, nurses, advanced practitioners, and other clinicians who care for people with CKD are invited to sign up for a morning of learning and networking. As a bonus, all those in attendance can earn up to 3.0 CME/CEs for just $25. Breakfast is included.

Register at www.kidney.org/ckdinform-louisville or contact Alana Miller by sending an email to alana.miller@kidney.org or calling (502) 585-5433.

The National Kidney Foundation is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

 

Head injuries can take longer to heal, especially for young athletes

Injuries are, for the most part, an accepted consequence of participating in youth sports. Beginning as early as preschool, kids are encouraged to participate in sports as a good way to help them learn about socialization, competition, and fitness.

Insider Louisville LogoBroken bones almost always heal. So do sprains and bruises. But parents, coaches, and kids are learning too often that bumps on the head must be taken more seriously. Brain injuries, including concussions, can have long-lasting effects that make it difficult to concentrate, focus, and remember important details.

That was the case for soccer goalie Ruby Fitzer, who had to quit playing the game she loved after suffering her fourth concussion. But she, and her parents, knew they had to make that difficult decision because they realized that the cumulative effect of the concussions could eventually lead to long-term damage.

“I loved playing soccer and I miss it all the time,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “I’ve had too many head injuries, and the risks of playing outweigh the benefits.”

Eddie Reynolds, executive director of the Brain Injury Alliance of Kentucky (BIAK), said the brain must be allowed to heal after an injury. He said a concussion is like a short in the brain’s wiring, and it needs to rest both physically and cognitively to heal. That means no computer, TV, or phone activity while in recovery.

“If a young person receives a second concussion, it can cause catastrophic damage. Removal from play is important. You have to get over the mindset that you just have to suck it up and be tough. You’ve only got one brain, and it’s important to take care of it,” he said.

To hear more from Ruby and Eddie, please click here.

 

Southern Kentucky Reentry Council hosts “Reentry Expo” on October 10 in Bowling Green

The Southern Kentucky Reentry Council is hosting its first “Reentry Expo” on Wednesday, October 10, at the Warren County Library’s Bob Kirby Branch in Bowling Green.

The event, which is co-sponsored by Passport, will run from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. There will be an Expungement Informational Session that begins at noon, in which attendees will receive an official copy of their record and learn about the process of expungement. Please note that no attorneys will be available following the presentation for one-on-one consultations, but Legal Aid will have a table during the event to set up future appointments.

There will also be resources available on a number of subjects including substance use disorder, mental health, second-chance employers, community resources, job coaching, and more.

Free snacks and drinks will be provided while supplies last.

For more information, please go online to southernkyreentry.org or call 270-883-2299.

 

Dignity has a home at Louisville’s Hildegard House

The spirit of compassion permeates the air at Hildegard House, the Louisville home where 65 volunteers serve on a rotating schedule to care for those “individuals at the end of life who have no home or loved ones to care for them.”

Insider Louisville LogoKaren Cassidy, a palliative care nurse, is the executive director. She led the drive to establish Hildegard House, and the non-profit was able to purchase the former church property, which was home to Ursuline Sisters for decades, in 2016.

Before taking on the leadership role at Hildegard House, Cassidy said that she was witness to many sad stories of individuals who came to the end of life with nothing.

“Every day I would see people at the end of life who had no home or caregivers to care for them,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “It’s hard to see someone die by themselves.”

On Sept. 22, a fund-raising event, “An Evening with Hildegard” is planned from 5-8 p.m. at the Atria Hospitality Center at 300 E. Market St. Local TV personality Rachel Platt with emcee the event, with guest performances by the Louisville Ballet and performance artist Jeannde Ford. Tickets are available through Hildegard House.

For more information, please click here.