Passport Health Plan and March of Dimes Donate Diaper Bags to Families with Babies in UofL Hospital NICU

As part of National Prematurity Awareness Month, Passport Health Plan and March of Dimes are stepping up to help families who have babies being treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Louisville Hospital.

Passport (the provider-sponsored, nonprofit, community-based health plan administering Medicaid benefits to more than 310,000 Kentuckians) and March of Dimes (the nation’s leading maternal and infant health nonprofit) are donating fully stocked diaper bags to help families during one of the most emotional and tense times in their lives.

“The preterm birth rate in the United States is on the rise for the third year in a row, a trend signaling an urgent health crisis for moms and babies,” says Passport CEO Mark Carter. “Passport and March of Dimes share a common goal – to work towards a day when every baby born in Kentucky arrives full-term and completely healthy.”

In Jefferson County, the preterm birth rate is an alarming 10.9 percent, based on 2016 data.

“Passport is proud to work with the March of Dimes to help promote healthy pregnancies and babies,” says Passport Chief Medical Officer Dr. Stephen Houghland. “Through this collaboration, we strive to prevent premature birth and birth defects, educating moms and supporting families in need.”

To read more, please click here.

 

Passport and March of Dimes donate 50 diaper bags to families with babies in UofL Hospital NICU

As part of National Prematurity Awareness Month, Passport Health Plan and March of Dimes are stepping up to help 50 families who have babies being treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at University of Louisville Hospital.

Passport (the provider-sponsored, nonprofit, community-based health plan administering Medicaid benefits to more than 310,000 Kentuckians) and March of Dimes (the nation’s leading maternal and infant health nonprofit) are donating 50 fully stocked diaper bags to help families during one of the most emotional and tense times in their lives.

The preterm birth rate in the United States is on the rise for the third year in a row, a trend signaling an urgent health crisis for moms and babies, March of Dimes says. In Jefferson County, the preterm birth rate is an alarming 10.9 percent, based on 2016 data. Premature birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) is the largest contributor to infant death in the United States and around the world.

The official donation will take place at 10 a.m. on Saturday, November 17 (World Prematurity Day) at UofL Hospital, 530 South Jackson Street. Members of the news media are invited to attend. Officials from Passport, March of Dimes, and UofL Hospital will be available for comment.

For more about March of Dimes, go online to marchofdimes.org or nacersano.org.

 

Symposium will help primary care practitioners learn more about detection and prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease

In an effort to help primary care practitioners (PCPs) and other healthcare professionals learn more about Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), the National Kidney Foundation, with the support of Passport Health Plan, is presenting “CKDinform: Early Detection and Prevention Symposium” from 7:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, October 20, at the Marriott Louisville East. ***UPDATE: This event is being rescheduled until early 2019 — stay tuned for more details, or email alana.miller@kidney.org.***

CKDinform is a collection of evidence-based resources provided in a diverse “toolbox” that will enable them to recognize CKD earlier and develop treatment protocols to slow progression.

Physicians, nurses, advanced practitioners, and other clinicians who care for people with CKD are invited to sign up for a morning of learning and networking. As a bonus, all those in attendance can earn up to 3.0 CME/CEs for just $25. Breakfast is included.

Register at www.kidney.org/ckdinform-louisville or contact Alana Miller by sending an email to alana.miller@kidney.org or calling (502) 585-5433.

The National Kidney Foundation is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

 

Dignity has a home at Louisville’s Hildegard House

The spirit of compassion permeates the air at Hildegard House, the Louisville home where 65 volunteers serve on a rotating schedule to care for those “individuals at the end of life who have no home or loved ones to care for them.”

Insider Louisville LogoKaren Cassidy, a palliative care nurse, is the executive director. She led the drive to establish Hildegard House, and the non-profit was able to purchase the former church property, which was home to Ursuline Sisters for decades, in 2016.

Before taking on the leadership role at Hildegard House, Cassidy said that she was witness to many sad stories of individuals who came to the end of life with nothing.

“Every day I would see people at the end of life who had no home or caregivers to care for them,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “It’s hard to see someone die by themselves.”

On Sept. 22, a fund-raising event, “An Evening with Hildegard” is planned from 5-8 p.m. at the Atria Hospitality Center at 300 E. Market St. Local TV personality Rachel Platt with emcee the event, with guest performances by the Louisville Ballet and performance artist Jeannde Ford. Tickets are available through Hildegard House.

For more information, please click here.

 

Psychologist uses his own life lessons – including a failed suicide attempt – to help others thinking about taking their own lives

After someone commits suicide, family members and friends are left to wonder why. They reconstruct recent events and interactions, trying to recall any signs that their loved one was contemplating taking their own life.

Insider Louisville Logo“The biggest feeling is guilt for not seeing it,” Dr. Josh Smith, a licensed clinical psychologist, says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “Even when the individual does not show any discernible signs you feel like there is something that you missed.”

During National Suicide Awareness Month this month, the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI) encourages everyone to share resources and stories in an effort to simply talk about the highly stigmatized topic.

In Kentucky, suicide is on the rise, with 776 deaths occurring in 2017. There were 584 deaths by suicide in Jefferson County between 2011 and 2015.

To help tackle this issue, the Louisville Health Advisory Board is holding free suicide prevention training at 85 locations around Jefferson County from Sept. 9 through 15 in association with National Suicide Prevention Week. The 90-minute “Question. Persuade. Refer.” (QPR) sessions are designed to teach people how to respond to someone in crisis and are taught much like CPR. The goal of the training is to educate people on how to talk with someone who might be at risk. To learn more and see a complete list of the times and locations, please go online to qprlou.com.

To hear more from Dr. Smith, including his very personal stories about suicide, please click here.

 

Louisville Health Advisory Board plans free suicide prevention trainings to help reduce deaths

One person dies by suicide in Kentucky about every 11 hours, making it the 11th leading cause of death overall, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Efforts to increase suicide prevention and awareness include many different things, but the Louisville Health Advisory Board (LHAB) is adding something new this year.

To try to bring suicides in the city down to zero, LHAB — of which Passport is a proud member — is offering suicide prevention training in more than 85 locations during National Suicide Prevention Week (Sept. 9-15) as part of its “Bold Moves Against Suicide Louisville” initiative.

“The concept is that any suicide that exists may be related to an opportunity to stop that suicide,” said Dr. Val Slayton, a member of the LHAB behavioral health committee. “And an important part of being able to stop suicide is by having individuals understand what to look for. And then how to intervene.”

The free 90-minute “Question. Persuade. Refer. (QPR)” training is designed to teach people how to respond to someone in crisis and is taught much like CPR. It is designed to teach people how to recognize the warning signs of suicide, how to offer hope and how to get help and save a life.

To see where the classes are being offered, please go online to qprlou.org. If you or someone you know is in crisis, the national suicide prevention hotline is 1-800-273-8255. The Crisis Text Line is also available 24/7 by texting HOME to 741741.

 

Charla Young’s “Power to Exhale” group brings Empowerment Tour around Kentucky during the month of September

Power to Exhale, a global women’s empowerment organization headquartered in Louisville, is bringing its empowerment tour to the state of Kentucky.

Sponsored by Passport, the Power to Exhale tour will partner with community, education, and entertainment providers in various communities around the Commonwealth.

“This will be an RV empowerment tour rolling from city to city to give people in the community everything from information on controlling their blood pressure to a road map on how to live your best life,” said Power to Exhale Founder Charla Young. “We will also stop to build a Habitat for Humanity Home, volunteer at Dare to Care of Louisville and stand proudly on the platform of empowerment as we march through a community parade. This RV Tour will be All Things Empowerment.”

The RV Tour kicks off Saturday, September 1, at the Big Four Bridge in Downtown Louisville, where more than 200 Power to Exhale members will gather to walk with a platform solidarity, sisterhood and service. Other stops will include Lexington, Bowling Green, Radcliff/Elizabethtown, and Covington. Every stop is free and open to the public.

To see the full list of stops, please click here.

For more information, please contact Charla Young at exhalequestions@gmail.com or by calling (502) 938-9454, or go online to powertoexhale.org.

 

Passport helps present event focused on future of food security in Louisville

Passport is joining with other area organizations and agencies to present “The Future of Food Security in Louisville,” an event designed to discuss solutions that could reduce food insecurity across the community.

The forum — which takes place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 18, at Home of the Innocents, 1100 E. Market St. in Louisville — will include a keynote address from Dr. Wayne Tuckson, president of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, a panel discussion featuring representatives from four local nonprofits, two Metro departments and the Jefferson County Public Schools district, and more.

Light refreshments consisting of organic farm-fresh produce from one of New Roots’ 12 community Fresh Stop Markets will be prepared onsite and served to attendees.

Joining Passport as event organizers are Louisville Urban League, the Jewish Community Center, and the American Heart Association. Other participating agencies include Dare to Care, Lift a Life Foundation, JCPS, New Roots, Farm to Table, The Center for Health Equity, Louisville Cooperative Grocery, and Greater Louisville Medical Society.

For more information or to register for the free event, please click here.

 

Parents have a right to get involved if they think their teen is getting addicted to drugs or alcohol

Addiction is a troubling and potentially earth-shattering disease at any age, so when a teen becomes addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even something that seems harmless like a video game, the consequences can be devastating.

Insider Louisville LogoAndrew Davidson is a licensed clinical social worker whose private practice is centered on 14- to 18-year-olds. In other words, he knows how teenagers’ minds work, what motivates them, and what triggers addictive behavior.

Teens are most likely to experiment with alcohol, he says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville, adding that he has seen the whole list of addictive drugs, from marijuana to stimulants to opioids, in his patients. And he is quick to point out that gambling and video games are increasingly affecting young people in a negative way.

“I use a harm-reduction approach – I’m trying to reduce any kind of harm they could do,” he says. “If they choose to use, they need to know what the dangers are.”

To hear more from Davidson, please click here. To read more, please click here.

 

More Services Become Available for Louisvillians Seeking Treatment in Opioid Crisis

Insider Louisville LogoAddiction does not discriminate. Its victims cross all demographic and socio-economic lines, live in every part of our city, and are members of every age group and gender.

Thankfully, the number of available beds for rehab treatment in Louisville has been increasing, but it is still not enough to match demand. Heroin may be the drug most likely to send someone looking for help today, but other substances – including alcohol – have the capacity to ruin lives.

For Shreeta Waldon, a licensed chemical and drug counselor at House of Ruth in Old Louisville, the key is for people to acknowledge an issue exists in the first place.

“First you have to tell me that you believe that there’s a problem,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “You can’t create a new life, or replace that old life with a new one, if you don’t think you had a problem with it.”

To hear more from Shreeta Waldon, please click here.