Kentucky Cabinet provides updated information about KY HEALTH program

KY Health NoticeWe are still waiting for official word from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) about Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin’s Section 1115 waiver application proposal, known as KY HEALTH (Helping to Engage and Achieve Long Term Health).

In the meantime, the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has produced a “Kentucky HEALTH Quick Facts”one-pager for all Kentuckians. It is available online on the Kentucky HEALTH website under “additional information.” Also available online is the updated Kentucky HEALTH Overview Presentation and a quick reference Kentucky HEALTH Eligibility Summary.

 

 

Passport Plans Workshops for Members of Provider Network to Learn About New Claims System and Provider Portal

Passport is holding annual provider workshops to educate providers on Medicaid processes, procedures, and more. This year, Passport’s workshops will be dedicated to training on the new claims system and provider portal.

Passport will offer training opportunities around the state of Kentucky:

  • Bowling Green – Tuesday, August 29, at the National Corvette Museum, 350 Corvette Dr.
  • Pikeville – Thursday, August 31, at the Hilton Garden Inn Pikeville, 849 Hambley Blvd.
  • Erlanger – Wednesday, September 6, at Receptions, 1379 Donaldson Hwy.
  • Paducah – Friday, September 8, at Baptist Paducah Church, 2501 KY Ave.
  • Ashland – Tuesday, September 12, at the Ashland Plaza Hotel, 1441 Winchester Ave.
  • Owensboro – Thursday, September 14, at Moonlite Bar-B-Q Inn, 2840 W Parrish Ave.
  • Lexington – Tuesday, September 19, or Wednesday, September 20, at Fasig-Tipton Company, 2400 Newtown Pike
  • Louisville – Friday, September 22 or Monday, September 25 at Norton Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Plaza 1, 4001 Dutchmans LN, St Matthews, KY 40207 or Wednesday, September 27 at Home of the Innocents 1100 Market Street, Louisville, KY 40206

All training workshops will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Eastern Time and will include lunch.

If a provider is unable to attend any of these dates, training webinars will also be offered on Tuesday, September 19, and Tuesday September 26, both at 2 p.m. Eastern Time.

To register, providers should email their date/location to providerinquiries@passporthealthplan.com, or can go to the “Educational Resources” section of Passport’s website then click on Provider Workshops. For providers who have questions, they can call Passport Provider Services at (800) 578-0775.

 

Kentucky DMS posts Medicaid Address Change Form online for members who need it

Kentucky Unbridled Spirit logoThe Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has posted a Medicaid Change of Address form online for any Kentucky Medicaid member who needs to update their home address. The form is available by clicking here.

If DMS receives any returned mail from an address that is not current, members could be dis-enrolled from Passport (and lose all of their Passport-specific benefits). However, if this happens, the member will NOT lose their overall Medicaid eligibility; instead, they will remain eligible for Kentucky Medicaid and will be in the fee-for-service (FFS) category until their address is updated.​

If an address appears incorrect, the member will have the remainder of that month plus another month to update the address.

To update their address, the Kentucky Medicaid member just needs to print out the form, fill it out, sign it and either fax it to 1-502-573-2005 or send it by regular mail to Centralized Mail, PO Box 2104, Frankfort, KY 40601.

 

National Foster Care Month shines spotlight on 400,000 youth who need assistance

May is National Foster Care Month, when we pay special attention to the more than 400,000 children and youth in foster care. There’s an overwhelming need for individuals, families, and communities to become involved as foster parents, respite providers, volunteers, or mentors of children who need an adult role model.

Passport works very closely with the Kentucky Department of Community Based Services (DCBS) to help increase the adoption or placement of children in DCBS custody. DCBS Commissioner Adria Johnson recently said that DCBS moved children 5,558 times last year.

The National Foster Care Month website is full of resources to help support children, youth, and their families, especially those involved in foster care. Some ways to help include the following:

  • Becoming a foster parent
  • Volunteering as a court appointed special advocate (CASA) for children
  • Being a mentor or “supportive adult” in a youth’s life
  • Joining or hosting a fundraising event
  • Donating services, goods, computers, etc. to older youth in foster care
  • Lending a hand to help current foster parents and caregivers with their day-to-day needs

Visit the section dedicated to communities and take the opportunity to learn more about how to become a foster parent or find other ways to contribute to the positive development of children and youth involved with foster care. You can also join Passport on the National Foster Care Month Campaign Facebook page, which is open to all individuals, organizations, groups, or agencies with an interest in foster care. The page is your place to share, learn, and promote events, resources, stories, and photos celebrating National Foster Care Month.

For more information, contact Child Welfare Information Gateway at NFCM@childwelfare.gov or call (800) 394-3366.

 

March of Dimes and others continue to help women reduce risk factors of premature births

HopeEvery expectant mother has an ideal vision of the birthing process, one that results in her holding her newborn in her hospital room with family gathered around.

But the reality is that premature births happen — and in Kentucky they happen at a rate 2 percent higher than the national average. When a baby is born prior to the 37th week of pregnancy, it is considered premature. There’s no official cause of premature birth, and the March of Dimes spends millions of dollars on research to determine ways to help mothers carry babies to full term births.

“The cause of premature birth is unknown,” Ryan Burt, Wellness Manager at Passport Health Plan, said in an Insider Louisville article. “There are certain risk factors that can lead to premature birth and we can tell women to be sure to lower their risk, but the actual reason is still unknown.”

To read more about this, please click here. To register for the March of Dimes’ biggest annual fund-raiser, the Greater Louisville March for Babies, on Saturday, May 13 on the Big Four Lawn at Waterfront Park, please click here.

 

Healthcare Leadership School Co-Founder Explains How Compassionate Program Was Formed

Insider Louisville LogoHanaâ Benjeddi is one of the founders of Healthcare Leadership School (HLS), an international organization that ignites the passions of the next generation of compassionate healthcare leaders.

Ahead of North America’s first HLS, which is cosponsored by Compassionate Louisville’s Healthcare Constellation and the University of Louisville School of Medicine and will be held June 10-18 in Leitchfield, Kentucky, Dr. Benjeddi looks back on how the organization came to be:

In 2011, a group of like-minded and ambitious medical students gathered and agreed that the current healthcare system was far from where they envisioned it. They realized that in order to change things, they, as a next generation of healthcare workers, must embody the change so that they can be living examples of our values. And so, HLS was born.

The first edition took place in The Netherlands and gathered 64 participants and 20 trainers, as well as speakers and volunteers. Through a public invitation in which hundreds of students were mobilized, they featured Dr. Patch Adams to the first edition as a doctor who truly walked his talk and served as an example of a different kind of working as a physician.

Two more editions followed in 2013 (The Netherlands again) and 2015 (South Africa), and now the organization is coming to the United States to meet in Kentucky in June. All in all, nearly five hundred students and young professionals from over 44 different countries have been a part of the Healthcare Leadership School community and now form a network of compassionate leaders poised to be the change they envision for the health of their own communities.

To read more, please click here. For more information on HLS-Louisville, please visit the Humans of Health website.

 

Passport and American Diabetes Association encourage all Kentuckians to take part in Diabetes Alert Day

ADA-passport-logoAre you at risk for developing diabetes? The American Diabetes Association and Passport Health Plan are asking all Kentuckians to take the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test in honor of all the Association’s annual Alert Day set for Tuesday, March 28, 2017.

Alert Day is a day to sound the alarm about the prevalence of type 2 diabetes across Kentucky and our country.

Companies and/or organizations interested in participating in Alert Day can download the complete e-toolkit by visiting WellLivesHere.org.

The following locations in Lexington will have screenings on Alert Day, March 28, from 10 am to 2 pm:

  • Walmart – 4051 Nicholasville Road
  • Walmart North Park Marketplace – 500 New Circle Road

Paper type 2 diabetes risk tests and other diabetes materials will also be available on Alert Day from 10 am to 2 pm at the following locations:

  • Walmart- 112 Osbourne Way, Georgetown
  • Walmart- 2350 Grey Lag Way, Lexington

The following locations in Louisville will have screenings on Alert Day from 9 am to 2 pm:

  • Neighborhood Place Ujima – 3610 Bohne Ave.
  • Neighborhood Place Charmoli – 200 Juneau Drive, Suite 200
  • Neighborhood Place3 South Central – 4255 Hazelwood Ave.
  • Neighborhood Place South Jefferson/Fairdale – 1000 Neighborhood Place
  • Family Health Centers Portland – 2215 Portland Ave.

For more information, please click here.

 

U.S. uninsured rate hits another record low, at just 8.8 percent without health insurance

NHIS LogoThe nation’s uninsured rate dipped slightly to 8.8 percent between January and September 2016, down from 9.1 percent the year before, according to the latest National Health Interview Survey data.

According to the report, in the first 9 months of 2016, 28.2 million people of all ages were uninsured at the time of interview, 20.4 million fewer than in 2010. Also, Hispanic adults saw the greatest gains, but remain biggest opportunity – only 24.7 percent of Hispanics were uninsured in the first nine months of 2016, down from more than 40 percent in 2013.

In Kentucky, just 6.5 person of people were uninsured at the time they were interviewed, while 46.7 percent said that they had public health plan coverage (such as Medicaid or Medicare) during the nine-month period and 57.1 percent said they had private health insurance coverage during that timeframe.

This report from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) presents selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the January-September 2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), along with comparable estimates from previous calendar years. This report is updated quarterly and is part of the NHIS Early Release (ER) Program, which releases updated selected estimates that are available from the NHIS website.

 

Kentuckians with lower incomes are much more likely to try e-cigarettes, new poll shows

foundation for a healthy KYDespite warnings that e-cigarettes can be harmful, nearly 40 percent of Kentuckians age 18-45 have tried an e-cig, according to the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP). In fact, Kentuckians with lower incomes also were about 74 percent more likely to have tried vaping than those with higher incomes.

“Research suggests that e-cigs may be a gateway to using other forms of tobacco, and they can be just as harmful,” Ben Chandler, president and CEO of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, said in a news release. “They expose users to toxic chemicals, including nicotine, which long has been proven to be addictive and responsible for a wide range of health issues. E-cigs are simply not a safe alternative to smoking, especially for young adults and nonsmokers.”

KHIP also asked opinions about the safety of e-cigarettes. About three in 10 Kentucky adults thought e-cigs were safer than tobacco cigarettes, and 19 percent thought they were less safe. A much larger proportion – 45 percent – thought there was no difference in safety between the two.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a report in December 2016 stating that the use of e-cigarettes by youth and young adults often leads to cigarette smoking, other tobacco use and nicotine addiction, with all the health dangers associated with nicotine addiction. The agency raised concerns that e-cig marketers have been using tactics that attract youth and young adults and said that the incidence of this age group trying e-cigs doubled from 2013 to 2014, the latest date for which data was available. The U.S. Surgeon General has called the rising use of e-cigarettes among young adults a “major public health problem.”

To see the full KHIP report on e-smoking, please click here.

 

Rural areas saw greatest increase in access to healthcare under Medicaid Expansion, according to Indiana University study

Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act greatly increased access to health care for Americans, especially in rural areas, says an Indiana University study published in The Journal of Rural Health.

Researchers, who used data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey from 2011-15, found that expansion “increased the probability of Medicaid coverage for targeted populations in rural and urban areas, with a significantly greater increase in rural areas, but some of these gains were offset by reductions in individual purchased insurance among rural populations,” according to a Kentucky Health News article.

Medicaid covered almost 636,000 adult Kentuckians in the second quarter of this year, with the great majority of enrollees covered under Medicaid expansion and almost half of them young adults, according to a report done for the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. The report found that 493,199, or 78 percent, of the 635,747 adults covered by Medicaid in Kentucky were covered by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s expansion of the program to those who earn up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. The remaining 142,548 were covered by traditional Medicaid.

IU researchers found that Medicaid expansion increased the probability that low-income people would have health coverage, and it increased Medicaid coverage more in rural areas than in cities. There was some evidence that in rural areas, the expansion was accompanied by some shifting from individually purchased insurance to Medicaid.