Head injuries can take longer to heal, especially for young athletes

Injuries are, for the most part, an accepted consequence of participating in youth sports. Beginning as early as preschool, kids are encouraged to participate in sports as a good way to help them learn about socialization, competition, and fitness.

Insider Louisville LogoBroken bones almost always heal. So do sprains and bruises. But parents, coaches, and kids are learning too often that bumps on the head must be taken more seriously. Brain injuries, including concussions, can have long-lasting effects that make it difficult to concentrate, focus, and remember important details.

That was the case for soccer goalie Ruby Fitzer, who had to quit playing the game she loved after suffering her fourth concussion. But she, and her parents, knew they had to make that difficult decision because they realized that the cumulative effect of the concussions could eventually lead to long-term damage.

“I loved playing soccer and I miss it all the time,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “I’ve had too many head injuries, and the risks of playing outweigh the benefits.”

Eddie Reynolds, executive director of the Brain Injury Alliance of Kentucky (BIAK), said the brain must be allowed to heal after an injury. He said a concussion is like a short in the brain’s wiring, and it needs to rest both physically and cognitively to heal. That means no computer, TV, or phone activity while in recovery.

“If a young person receives a second concussion, it can cause catastrophic damage. Removal from play is important. You have to get over the mindset that you just have to suck it up and be tough. You’ve only got one brain, and it’s important to take care of it,” he said.

To hear more from Ruby and Eddie, please click here.

 

Dignity has a home at Louisville’s Hildegard House

The spirit of compassion permeates the air at Hildegard House, the Louisville home where 65 volunteers serve on a rotating schedule to care for those “individuals at the end of life who have no home or loved ones to care for them.”

Insider Louisville LogoKaren Cassidy, a palliative care nurse, is the executive director. She led the drive to establish Hildegard House, and the non-profit was able to purchase the former church property, which was home to Ursuline Sisters for decades, in 2016.

Before taking on the leadership role at Hildegard House, Cassidy said that she was witness to many sad stories of individuals who came to the end of life with nothing.

“Every day I would see people at the end of life who had no home or caregivers to care for them,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “It’s hard to see someone die by themselves.”

On Sept. 22, a fund-raising event, “An Evening with Hildegard” is planned from 5-8 p.m. at the Atria Hospitality Center at 300 E. Market St. Local TV personality Rachel Platt with emcee the event, with guest performances by the Louisville Ballet and performance artist Jeannde Ford. Tickets are available through Hildegard House.

For more information, please click here.

 

More Services Become Available for Louisvillians Seeking Treatment in Opioid Crisis

Insider Louisville LogoAddiction does not discriminate. Its victims cross all demographic and socio-economic lines, live in every part of our city, and are members of every age group and gender.

Thankfully, the number of available beds for rehab treatment in Louisville has been increasing, but it is still not enough to match demand. Heroin may be the drug most likely to send someone looking for help today, but other substances – including alcohol – have the capacity to ruin lives.

For Shreeta Waldon, a licensed chemical and drug counselor at House of Ruth in Old Louisville, the key is for people to acknowledge an issue exists in the first place.

“First you have to tell me that you believe that there’s a problem,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “You can’t create a new life, or replace that old life with a new one, if you don’t think you had a problem with it.”

To hear more from Shreeta Waldon, please click here.