Commitment to Compassion Luncheon Recognizes Those Who Extend Consideration in Their Work and Lives

Insider Louisville LogoLouisville is fortunate to have individuals who bring a compassionate attitude to their work, people who inspire others to extend consideration and kindness in the way they go about their lives.

The city is also fortunate to see that some of those compassionate champions are recognized, thanks to the annual “Commitment to Compassion” luncheon. The second annual event took place at the Muhammad Ali Center in February, honoring six individuals and an organization.

The event, which will be celebrated again in 2018, is sponsored by Passport Health Plan, Compassionate Louisville, and Insider Louisville.

To read about two of the women who were honored in 2017 – Betty “BJ” Adkins and Lisa Benner – please click here.

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Healthy Hoops Kentucky helps bring hope to kids with asthma through doctors, basketball

No child wants to be on the sidelines during play time. However, it’s an unfortunate fact that children with asthma must often sit idly by while their friends run around.

Countless local kids with asthma have benefited from an annual program that offers support, education, and fun for a decade now. The 10th annual Healthy Hoops Kentucky event will take place at Central High School on Saturday, Sept. 9. The free event is open to any family with a child aged 7-14 who has asthma. You can sign up online or call (502) 585-8429.

Doctors, nurses, and other health professionals volunteer their time to provide information and education to families, and the kids love it – in part because of the presence of Louisville’s Doctor of Dunk, Darrell Griffith.

“Over a 10-year period, I’ve seen a lot of success stories,” Griffith said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “The idea of educating parents, and brother and sisters, has been a really, really great program for the community. It gives the kids hope that they can participate, and be normal, because sometimes when you have asthma you don’t think you’re normal, especially at a young age.”

 

Cedar Lake honored at ‘A Commitment to Compassion’ luncheon

Compassionate LouisvillePassport Health Plan, Compassionate Louisville, and Insider Louisville celebrate inspiring individuals and organizations in healthcare annually through “A Commitment to Compassion,” a luncheon that shines a light on those who embody compassion and make a difference in the lives of others every day.

As we prepare for the 2018 luncheon, we wanted to take a look back at the six people and one organization honored at the 2017 event.

Cedar Lake, a private not-for-profit organization, activates its commitment to compassion through its support of more than 200 of our neighbors with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The faith-based organization was founded in 1970 by Louisville-area parents of people with intellectual disabilities. For more information, please click here or go online to cedarlake.org.

 

Parents & teachers ‘have to be more vigilant’ to prevent bullying in schools and online

Insider Louisville LogoFor a significant number of school-age children, heading back to school is a happy time of reuniting with friends, meeting new teachers, and adopting new routines. But for an unfortunate few, it also means coming face-to-face with a most unwelcome sight – the bully.

Dr. Terry Scott is Director of the Center for Instructional and Behavioral Research in Schools at the University of Louisville’s Department of Special Education. He says that bullying in schools may not be more prevalent than it used to be, but social media provides more opportunities for bullies to do damage these days.

“What we’ve found is that if you simply go into a school and tell kids to stop bullying, the bullying tends to go underground,” he says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “And cyber-bullying is a great place for it to go underground because adults aren’t seeing every exchange the kids have.”

 

New compassion initiative helps healthcare teams build strong “Foundations for Flourishing”

Compassionate LouisvilleCircumstances can sometimes make it difficult to develop and sustain optimal dynamics where people are at their best, fully engaged, and feeling truly valued and fulfilled in their work.

To support healthcare teams in developing dynamics that enable them to be their best and experience more of what is important to them, Compassionate Louisville’s Healthcare Constellation and Point C Business Consultancy are partnering on an initiative called “Foundations for Flourishing.”

Led by Katie Gaughan, president of Point C, this team and culture initiative combines experiential learning and transformative dialogue in phased sessions over several months.

“After four years volunteering in a variety of capacities for Compassionate Louisville, I am excited to have found a unique way to leverage my passion and expertise to cultivate compassion in support of the wellbeing of healthcare professionals, teams, and organizations,” Gaughan says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “It is amazing to witness people realizing their potential to truly flourish.”

 

Much more has been learned about how to help children with autism, but parents still face challenges

Insider Louisville LogoThere is ample evidence that the number of individuals with autism in America is growing, and with that growth comes a better understanding of what it is and how to treat it.

There is also mounting evidence that early detection, maybe as early as age 2, can allow for intervention that will make a true difference in a child’s life.

Yet being the parent of a child on the autism spectrum remains a very difficult challenge. Sandra Duverge has faced that challenge for two decades, learning the ins and outs of school systems, medical treatments and government benefits in providing for her son, Sebastian, now 23.

“I tell parents you’re going to put all this effort in, as you would anyway for your child, and you push so your child can have a typical life and be a happy person. That’s where you spend your energy,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville.

To see a short video about this, please click here. Or to read more, click here.

 

Youth leaders inspire a compassionate future at Healthcare Leadership School

Insider Louisville LogoHorrified by needless deaths of patients in the Emergency Room, medical student Eddy Uwoghiren began to question his motives in becoming a doctor.

“In Nigeria,” he said, “talented young students took up medicine because of parental expectation and wanting to be rich.”

But for Eddy, asking why Nigeria doesn’t have an ambulance system became a more important question.

Following his experience at North America’s first Healthcare Leadership School (HLS), which was held June 10-18 in a rural setting an hour from Louisville, he’s committed his life to building trauma services in Nigeria, by becoming a trauma surgeon and also by advocating for improved services.

“I will be a great journalist as well as a surgeon,” he proclaimed, according to a Passport-sponsored article in Insider Louisville.

To read more about the 2017 HLS, which was hosted by the Healthcare Constellation of Compassionate Louisville, please click here.

 

Opioid-addiction is a crisis around the region and nation, but treatment options are available

Insider Louisville LogoNo one is disputing that the opioid crisis is an epidemic in communities all over America. What starts for many as an addiction to legally prescribed painkillers can become an overwhelming craving that makes the introduction of heroin an economical and logical choice for many.

In fact, the number of deaths due to heroin overdose have recently surpassed the number of deaths due to motor vehicle accidents, Dr. Mary Bouldin, director of addiction medicine at LifeSpring Health Systems in Jeffersonville, says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville.

“It’s very rare that somebody starts off shooting heroin,” she says. “Nobody wakes up saying ‘I think I want to be an injection-drug user today,’ but what happens is that because of the development of tolerance, people keep crossing lines that they thought they would never cross.”

For those caught up in the addiction cycle, it can be challenging to get treatment. To read more from Dr. Bouldin, and to see how the issue has affected one former NBA and UK basketball star, please click here.

 

Go Red for Women helps increase awareness and education year-round about importance of heart health

Go Red for Women LogoGoing Red, as defined by the American Heart Association (AHA), may be the best thing a woman can do for her health.

The AHA began its Go Red for Women initiative in 2003 to bring awareness to the fact that heart disease is the number one killer of women, according to a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. That amounts to 1 in 3 women who die, which is more than all cancer deaths combined, according to the AHA.

Go Red for Women is “a passionate, emotional, social initiative designed to empower women to take charge of their heart health,” according to the website. More than a million women nationally have committed to Go Red.

“My goal is to make it not only a February thing, but we should make it 365 days a year. Everybody should be thinking about heart health,” said Jill Bell, vice president of Passport Health Plan and chair of the 2017 Go Red for Women Luncheon in Louisville, which will be held on Friday, May 19. For more information about the event, please click here. Or to see a video about what Go Red for Women means to two Louisville women, please click here.

Caregiver burnout is a growing problem across the U.S.

Restoring JoyFrom health sector caregivers to medical students and faculty, caregiver burnout continues to be a growing problem across the United States, according to a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville.

A study released in 2015 by the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association reveals that more than 50 percent of physicians in the U.S. demonstrate at least one sign of burnout, a 9 percent increase between 2011 and 2014.

And, according to the 2016 National Healthcare Retention & RN Staffing Report published by NSI Nursing Solutions, Inc., the turnover rate for bedside RNs increased to 17.2 percent, up from 16.4 percent in 2014.

The Joy Experiment seeks to tackle this challenge through an exploratory pilot project for finding new way to use creativity (combined with compassion) to mitigate burnout and improve the health and well-being of caregivers. To learn more about this, please click here.