Passport implements new requirement for medically frail members

Effective July 1, 2018, Passport Health Plan has implemented a new requirement for medically frail members.

Some of our members may be considered medically frail, meaning that they are exempt from any cost-sharing and are automatically placed into Passport’s Care Management programs. A person may be determined as medically frail if they have a severe condition including, but not limited to:

  • Activities of Daily Living (physical, intellectual or developmental limitations such as with dressing, eating, etc)
  • Disabling mental disorder (including serious mental illness)
  • Chronic substance use disorder (SUD)
  • Chronic homelessness
  • Serious and complex medical conditions

Providers who think they have a patient who is a Passport member and might be classified as medically frail should first check the Passport Portal to determine if they have already been deemed medically frail via claims data or another provider attestation. If the member has not been deemed as medically frail, providers are asked to submit an attestation on the patient’s condition.

The attestation form is available online by clicking here. Providers can check the Medically Frail Condition Guide for more information.

Providers who have questions should call Passport Provider Services at 1-800-578-0775, or contact their Passport Provider Services Representative.

 

Homelessness Around Greater Lexington Declines to Lowest Level in 12 years

The number of people experiencing homelessness in Lexington has reached its lowest level since at least 2005, according to a new report from the city.

“We’ve still got work to do, but we’re making progress,” Mayor Jim Gray said in a news release. “Our work and investments are beginning to pay off.”

In 2005, 882 people were found to be homeless in Lexington during the annual complete count exercise. This number continued to trend upward, reaching its peak in both 2011 and 2014, with over 1,500 homeless on any given night in Lexington. Results from the 2018 count show that 685 people slept on the streets, in an emergency shelter or in transitional housing on the night of January 24.

“Today is a moment to pause and recognize our progress, celebrate what has worked, and assess the great challenges that still lie ahead,” added Polly Ruddick, Director of the Office of Homelessness Prevention and Intervention (Passport partners with the Office to help improve the health and quality of life of all Kentuckians). “Every night there are still about 700 people in our community with no place to call home, and many hundreds more on the margins, fighting to stay off the streets. Our work continues until everyone in Lexington has access to opportunities, support services, and safe, decent, affordable housing.”

In addition to the overall numbers, Lexington is also seeing improvements in:

  • The number of veterans who are homeless. In 2014, 203 homeless veterans were reported on the night of the count; this year only 92 veterans were found to be homeless, a difference of 54.6%.
  • The number of people who are chronically homeless. In 2014, 186 individuals were reported to have been living on the streets or in an emergency shelter for longer than a year, as compared to 92 people this year.

“Permanent housing is now the priority. And it’s working – we have significantly fewer people sleeping on the street,” Gray said.

The annual homeless count is conducted each January, and is required for communities receiving federal homeless funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Teams of volunteers visit outdoor sites where people experiencing homelessness have been known to congregate, while shelters and housing programs report their occupancy. This year, 18 teams canvassed over 100 locations throughout Lexington and Fayette County.

 

Community comes together to help family-based homeless shelter reopen in Northern Kentucky

Family Promise of Northern Kentucky

The only homeless shelter in Northern Kentucky that offered services to entire families without splitting them up has secured enough funding to reopen this summer.

Family Promise Northern Kentucky had to close in 2014 because of financial issues, but thanks to a small group of community members, the facility will be reopening soon, according to a report from WKRC-TV in Cincinnati.

“We had to overcome . . . just the idea of what everybody had of us folding and falling apart and thinking, oh it can’t be done, it can’t be put back together,” Karen Yates, who’s on the Family Promise Northern Kentucky board, says in the report.

Passport was among the community partners that helped Family Promise Northern Kentucky raise the money necessary to reopen, and hope to be ready to take in families starting on July 3.

According to the WKRC report, Family Promise Northern Kentucky will be able to take in four families or up to 14 people at a time. The organization will rely on a network of churches to take in the families overnight; during the day, they’ll be at the Family Promise Northern Kentucky office in Newport.

More information about Family Promise Northern Kentucky is available on its Facebook page.