Parents have a right to get involved if they think their teen is getting addicted to drugs or alcohol

Addiction is a troubling and potentially earth-shattering disease at any age, so when a teen becomes addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even something that seems harmless like a video game, the consequences can be devastating.

Insider Louisville LogoAndrew Davidson is a licensed clinical social worker whose private practice is centered on 14- to 18-year-olds. In other words, he knows how teenagers’ minds work, what motivates them, and what triggers addictive behavior.

Teens are most likely to experiment with alcohol, he says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville, adding that he has seen the whole list of addictive drugs, from marijuana to stimulants to opioids, in his patients. And he is quick to point out that gambling and video games are increasingly affecting young people in a negative way.

“I use a harm-reduction approach – I’m trying to reduce any kind of harm they could do,” he says. “If they choose to use, they need to know what the dangers are.”

To hear more from Davidson, please click here. To read more, please click here.

 

Heroin addiction affects many Kentuckians, but there are ways to reverse this epidemic

Insider Louisville LogoHeroin addiction is a problem that has exploded in Kentucky over the past several years. Three years ago, barely 1 in 100 people who came to The Healing Place detox facilities for help were there because of a heroin addiction. Today, that number is 95 percent. In that same time period, heroin arrests in Jefferson County have increased by 700 percent, prompting the launch of a “rocket docket” that serves to get addicts into treatment more quickly.

Still, despite the efforts of social services agencies and law enforcement officials, the epidemic continues to grow. That’s why The Healing Place helped organize a recent symposium, “Heroin: About Face. Reversing an Epidemic,” to bring together people representing social services agencies, law enforcement, the courts, and much more to address the issues and find solutions to the problem.

The keynote speaker was Tara Conner, the 2006 Miss USA from Russell Springs, who told her story of addiction that started at a very young age and eventually led to her treatment and life of recovery.

“I was grateful that I was sent to treatment because I didn’t know that addiction was a disease, I didn’t know what recovery looked like,” she said in a recent Passport-sponsored article in Insider Louisville. “Since that experience I immediately became an advocate. I was chucked into rehab by someone else, and if that hadn’t happened I might be dead.”

Among the other speakers were Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell, who lost a son to a heroin overdose in 2014; Dr. Greg Jones, medical director of the Kentucky Physicians Health Foundation; and Geoff Wilson, a licensed clinical social worker and certified alcohol and drug counselor.

For more information, please go online to InsiderLouisville.com.

 

Heroin symposium to put focus on treating addicts of all ages and from all areas

Heroin SymposiumThe heroin epidemic plaguing our city and our state continues to increase. It has been several years since the re-emergence of heroin in our area, yet 95 percent of clients arriving in The Healing Place detox facilities are coming in for heroin, according to a column written by Laci M. Comer, development project manager for The Healing Place, in The (Louisville) Courier-Journal.

“The new addict is 18 to 30 years old and comes from the suburban, more affluent ZIP codes,” Ms. Comer writes. “The face of addiction is absolutely changing and has a huge impact on our community.”

To help doing something about this, The Healing Place and Passport Health Plan are planning a daylong symposium called “Heroin: About Face – Reversing an Epidemic,” on Wednesday, October 28 in Louisville. It is encouraged that physicians, social workers, counselors, human resources personnel, and certified drug & alcohol counselors who work with families and clients attend this symposium, along with families who deal directly with addiction.

Guest speakers will include:

  • Tara Conner, Miss USA 2006, who will share her story of abuse and recovery
  • Dreg Jones, MD, medical director of the Kentucky Physicians Health Foundation
  • Geoff Wilson, LCSW, CADC, a clinical social worker and certified alcohol & drug counselor in Kentucky for more than 20 years
  • Mike O’Connell, Jefferson County Attorney
  • A “Community Impact Panel” with representatives from law enforcement, corrections, and the health department

The symposium has been approved for 2.5 CME from the Kentucky Medical Association and 5.75 CEUs for various professions. The symposium begins at 7:30 a.m., and cost is $150.

For more information about the symposium or to register, go online to www.thehealingplace.org/heroin, send an email to events@thehealingplace.org or call (502) 357-1983.

 

Passport joins with The Healing Place to present symposium focused on fighting heroin addiction

Tara Conner, Miss USA 2006Heroin addiction has reached an epidemic level around Kentucky, affecting families, businesses, and communities as well as the addict and his or her family. In fact, Kentucky has the third-highest overdose rate in the nation, and nowhere is this more felt that at The Healing Place in Louisville, one of the nation’s most effective long-term, social model recovery programs for more than 25 years.

Beyond ruining people’s lives, heroin addiction also leads to an increased crime rate, a larger number of patients in area hospitals, and increases to the cost of healthcare. That’s why Passport and The Healing Place are gathering experts in the healthcare community to study the issue and address solutions.

“Heroin: About Face – Reversing an Epidemic” is a daylong symposium being planned by The Healing Place and sponsored by Passport on Wednesday, October 28. It is encouraged that physicians, social workers, counselors, human resources personnel, and certified drug & alcohol counselors who work with families and clients attend this symposium, along with families who deal directly with addiction.

Guest speakers will include:

  • Tara Conner, Miss USA 2006, (pictured) who will share her story of abuse and recovery
  • Dreg Jones, MD, medical director of the Kentucky Physicians Health Foundation
  • Geoff Wilson, LCSW, CADC, a clinical social worker and certified alcohol & drug counselor in Kentucky for more than 20 years
  • Mike O’Connell, Jefferson County Attorney
  • A “Community Impact Panel” with representatives from law enforcement, corrections, and the health department

The symposium has been approved for 2.5 CME from the Kentucky Medical Association and 5.75 CEUs for various professions.

For more information about the symposium or to register, go online to www.thehealingplace.org/heroin, send an email to events@thehealingplace.org or call (502) 357-1983.