Much more has been learned about how to help children with autism, but parents still face challenges

Insider Louisville LogoThere is ample evidence that the number of individuals with autism in America is growing, and with that growth comes a better understanding of what it is and how to treat it.

There is also mounting evidence that early detection, maybe as early as age 2, can allow for intervention that will make a true difference in a child’s life.

Yet being the parent of a child on the autism spectrum remains a very difficult challenge. Sandra Duverge has faced that challenge for two decades, learning the ins and outs of school systems, medical treatments and government benefits in providing for her son, Sebastian, now 23.

“I tell parents you’re going to put all this effort in, as you would anyway for your child, and you push so your child can have a typical life and be a happy person. That’s where you spend your energy,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville.

To see a short video about this, please click here. Or to read more, click here.

 

Study: MMR Vaccine not Linked to Autism, Even in High-Risk Kids

According to a Reuters wire service report about a new national study, the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine is not linked to development of autism spectrum disorders, even among children considered to be at risk. “Even for children who are high-risk, the vaccine does not play a role,” said lead author Dr. Anjali Jain. “We don’t know what does unfortunately, but it’s not the MMR vaccine.” Among nearly 100,000 children studied, receipt of the MMR vaccine did not increase the risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), regardless of whether kids were at higher risk because an older sibling already had the condition, researchers wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

A 1998 study that claimed to find a connection between the MMR vaccine and ASD was later debunked. The Lancet, the medical journal that originally published it, withdrew it. Studies continue to vouch for the safety of the vaccine. Still, some people continue to believe that the vaccine is connected to ASD.