Parents have a right to get involved if they think their teen is getting addicted to drugs or alcohol

Addiction is a troubling and potentially earth-shattering disease at any age, so when a teen becomes addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even something that seems harmless like a video game, the consequences can be devastating.

Insider Louisville LogoAndrew Davidson is a licensed clinical social worker whose private practice is centered on 14- to 18-year-olds. In other words, he knows how teenagers’ minds work, what motivates them, and what triggers addictive behavior.

Teens are most likely to experiment with alcohol, he says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville, adding that he has seen the whole list of addictive drugs, from marijuana to stimulants to opioids, in his patients. And he is quick to point out that gambling and video games are increasingly affecting young people in a negative way.

“I use a harm-reduction approach – I’m trying to reduce any kind of harm they could do,” he says. “If they choose to use, they need to know what the dangers are.”

To hear more from Davidson, please click here. To read more, please click here.

 

More Services Become Available for Louisvillians Seeking Treatment in Opioid Crisis

Insider Louisville LogoAddiction does not discriminate. Its victims cross all demographic and socio-economic lines, live in every part of our city, and are members of every age group and gender.

Thankfully, the number of available beds for rehab treatment in Louisville has been increasing, but it is still not enough to match demand. Heroin may be the drug most likely to send someone looking for help today, but other substances – including alcohol – have the capacity to ruin lives.

For Shreeta Waldon, a licensed chemical and drug counselor at House of Ruth in Old Louisville, the key is for people to acknowledge an issue exists in the first place.

“First you have to tell me that you believe that there’s a problem,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “You can’t create a new life, or replace that old life with a new one, if you don’t think you had a problem with it.”

To hear more from Shreeta Waldon, please click here.

 

Opioid-addiction is a crisis around the region and nation, but treatment options are available

Insider Louisville LogoNo one is disputing that the opioid crisis is an epidemic in communities all over America. What starts for many as an addiction to legally prescribed painkillers can become an overwhelming craving that makes the introduction of heroin an economical and logical choice for many.

In fact, the number of deaths due to heroin overdose have recently surpassed the number of deaths due to motor vehicle accidents, Dr. Mary Bouldin, director of addiction medicine at LifeSpring Health Systems in Jeffersonville, says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville.

“It’s very rare that somebody starts off shooting heroin,” she says. “Nobody wakes up saying ‘I think I want to be an injection-drug user today,’ but what happens is that because of the development of tolerance, people keep crossing lines that they thought they would never cross.”

For those caught up in the addiction cycle, it can be challenging to get treatment. To read more from Dr. Bouldin, and to see how the issue has affected one former NBA and UK basketball star, please click here.

 

Conference planned to talk about Kentucky youth’s use of e-cigarettes

No Smoking SignA conference to understand e-cigarettes and their effects on young Kentucky residents will be held at the London Community Center in Laurel County on March 24.

The program, called “Project e-Prevent,” will look at evidence-based information regarding e-cigarettes, analyze the association between e-cigarettes and nicotine addiction, discuss policy recommendations from medical and scientific authorities, discuss e-cigarette laws and enforcement, and clarify 100-percent-tobacco-free school policy.

The program is free and offers continuing education credits, but registration is required by March 11. Click here to see the full agenda or to register, or call 606-864-1432 for additional information.