Symposium will help primary care practitioners learn more about detection and prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease

In an effort to help primary care practitioners (PCPs) and other healthcare professionals learn more about Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), the National Kidney Foundation, with the support of Passport Health Plan, is presenting “CKDinform: Early Detection and Prevention Symposium” from 7:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, October 20, at the Marriott Louisville East. ***UPDATE: This event is being rescheduled until early 2019 — stay tuned for more details, or email alana.miller@kidney.org.***

CKDinform is a collection of evidence-based resources provided in a diverse “toolbox” that will enable them to recognize CKD earlier and develop treatment protocols to slow progression.

Physicians, nurses, advanced practitioners, and other clinicians who care for people with CKD are invited to sign up for a morning of learning and networking. As a bonus, all those in attendance can earn up to 3.0 CME/CEs for just $25. Breakfast is included.

Register at www.kidney.org/ckdinform-louisville or contact Alana Miller by sending an email to alana.miller@kidney.org or calling (502) 585-5433.

The National Kidney Foundation is the largest, most comprehensive and longstanding organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease.

 

Passport Advantage (HMO SNP) will expand into 12 more counties starting in January 2019

Passport Advantage (HMO SNP) is going to be expanding its service area to 12 additional counties, effective January 1, 2019.

PAD logoThe application was approved by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS) to expand the Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MAPD) Dual Special Needs Plan (D-SNP) to 12 additional counties. Currently, Passport Advantage covers residents of Bullitt, Hardin, Jefferson, and Nelson counties who have both Medicaid and Medicare benefits. Starting January 1, 2019, Passport Advantage will be available to residents of the following counties:

  • Breckinridge
  • Bullitt
  • Carroll
  • Grayson
  • Hardin
  • Henry
  • Jefferson
  • Larue
  • Marion
  • Meade
  • Nelson
  • Oldham
  • Shelby
  • Spencer
  • Trimble
  • Washington

For more information, please go online to passportadvantage.com or call toll-free 1-844-859-6152.

Head injuries can take longer to heal, especially for young athletes

Injuries are, for the most part, an accepted consequence of participating in youth sports. Beginning as early as preschool, kids are encouraged to participate in sports as a good way to help them learn about socialization, competition, and fitness.

Insider Louisville LogoBroken bones almost always heal. So do sprains and bruises. But parents, coaches, and kids are learning too often that bumps on the head must be taken more seriously. Brain injuries, including concussions, can have long-lasting effects that make it difficult to concentrate, focus, and remember important details.

That was the case for soccer goalie Ruby Fitzer, who had to quit playing the game she loved after suffering her fourth concussion. But she, and her parents, knew they had to make that difficult decision because they realized that the cumulative effect of the concussions could eventually lead to long-term damage.

“I loved playing soccer and I miss it all the time,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “I’ve had too many head injuries, and the risks of playing outweigh the benefits.”

Eddie Reynolds, executive director of the Brain Injury Alliance of Kentucky (BIAK), said the brain must be allowed to heal after an injury. He said a concussion is like a short in the brain’s wiring, and it needs to rest both physically and cognitively to heal. That means no computer, TV, or phone activity while in recovery.

“If a young person receives a second concussion, it can cause catastrophic damage. Removal from play is important. You have to get over the mindset that you just have to suck it up and be tough. You’ve only got one brain, and it’s important to take care of it,” he said.

To hear more from Ruby and Eddie, please click here.

 

Southern Kentucky Reentry Council hosts “Reentry Expo” on October 10 in Bowling Green

The Southern Kentucky Reentry Council is hosting its first “Reentry Expo” on Wednesday, October 10, at the Warren County Library’s Bob Kirby Branch in Bowling Green.

The event, which is co-sponsored by Passport, will run from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. There will be an Expungement Informational Session that begins at noon, in which attendees will receive an official copy of their record and learn about the process of expungement. Please note that no attorneys will be available following the presentation for one-on-one consultations, but Legal Aid will have a table during the event to set up future appointments.

There will also be resources available on a number of subjects including substance use disorder, mental health, second-chance employers, community resources, job coaching, and more.

Free snacks and drinks will be provided while supplies last.

For more information, please go online to southernkyreentry.org or call 270-883-2299.

 

Dignity has a home at Louisville’s Hildegard House

The spirit of compassion permeates the air at Hildegard House, the Louisville home where 65 volunteers serve on a rotating schedule to care for those “individuals at the end of life who have no home or loved ones to care for them.”

Insider Louisville LogoKaren Cassidy, a palliative care nurse, is the executive director. She led the drive to establish Hildegard House, and the non-profit was able to purchase the former church property, which was home to Ursuline Sisters for decades, in 2016.

Before taking on the leadership role at Hildegard House, Cassidy said that she was witness to many sad stories of individuals who came to the end of life with nothing.

“Every day I would see people at the end of life who had no home or caregivers to care for them,” she said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “It’s hard to see someone die by themselves.”

On Sept. 22, a fund-raising event, “An Evening with Hildegard” is planned from 5-8 p.m. at the Atria Hospitality Center at 300 E. Market St. Local TV personality Rachel Platt with emcee the event, with guest performances by the Louisville Ballet and performance artist Jeannde Ford. Tickets are available through Hildegard House.

For more information, please click here.

 

Passport implements new requirement for medically frail members

Effective July 1, 2018, Passport Health Plan has implemented a new requirement for medically frail members.

Some of our members may be considered medically frail, meaning that they are exempt from any cost-sharing and are automatically placed into Passport’s Care Management programs. A person may be determined as medically frail if they have a severe condition including, but not limited to:

  • Activities of Daily Living (physical, intellectual or developmental limitations such as with dressing, eating, etc)
  • Disabling mental disorder (including serious mental illness)
  • Chronic substance use disorder (SUD)
  • Chronic homelessness
  • Serious and complex medical conditions

Providers who think they have a patient who is a Passport member and might be classified as medically frail should first check the Passport Portal to determine if they have already been deemed medically frail via claims data or another provider attestation. If the member has not been deemed as medically frail, providers are asked to submit an attestation on the patient’s condition.

The attestation form is available online by clicking here. Providers can check the Medically Frail Condition Guide for more information.

Providers who have questions should call Passport Provider Services at 1-800-578-0775, or contact their Passport Provider Services Representative.

 

Psychologist uses his own life lessons – including a failed suicide attempt – to help others thinking about taking their own lives

After someone commits suicide, family members and friends are left to wonder why. They reconstruct recent events and interactions, trying to recall any signs that their loved one was contemplating taking their own life.

Insider Louisville Logo“The biggest feeling is guilt for not seeing it,” Dr. Josh Smith, a licensed clinical psychologist, says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “Even when the individual does not show any discernible signs you feel like there is something that you missed.”

During National Suicide Awareness Month this month, the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI) encourages everyone to share resources and stories in an effort to simply talk about the highly stigmatized topic.

In Kentucky, suicide is on the rise, with 776 deaths occurring in 2017. There were 584 deaths by suicide in Jefferson County between 2011 and 2015.

To help tackle this issue, the Louisville Health Advisory Board is holding free suicide prevention training at 85 locations around Jefferson County from Sept. 9 through 15 in association with National Suicide Prevention Week. The 90-minute “Question. Persuade. Refer.” (QPR) sessions are designed to teach people how to respond to someone in crisis and are taught much like CPR. The goal of the training is to educate people on how to talk with someone who might be at risk. To learn more and see a complete list of the times and locations, please go online to qprlou.com.

To hear more from Dr. Smith, including his very personal stories about suicide, please click here.

 

Louisville Health Advisory Board plans free suicide prevention trainings to help reduce deaths

One person dies by suicide in Kentucky about every 11 hours, making it the 11th leading cause of death overall, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Efforts to increase suicide prevention and awareness include many different things, but the Louisville Health Advisory Board (LHAB) is adding something new this year.

To try to bring suicides in the city down to zero, LHAB — of which Passport is a proud member — is offering suicide prevention training in more than 85 locations during National Suicide Prevention Week (Sept. 9-15) as part of its “Bold Moves Against Suicide Louisville” initiative.

“The concept is that any suicide that exists may be related to an opportunity to stop that suicide,” said Dr. Val Slayton, a member of the LHAB behavioral health committee. “And an important part of being able to stop suicide is by having individuals understand what to look for. And then how to intervene.”

The free 90-minute “Question. Persuade. Refer. (QPR)” training is designed to teach people how to respond to someone in crisis and is taught much like CPR. It is designed to teach people how to recognize the warning signs of suicide, how to offer hope and how to get help and save a life.

To see where the classes are being offered, please go online to qprlou.org. If you or someone you know is in crisis, the national suicide prevention hotline is 1-800-273-8255. The Crisis Text Line is also available 24/7 by texting HOME to 741741.

 

Charla Young’s “Power to Exhale” group brings Empowerment Tour around Kentucky during the month of September

Power to Exhale, a global women’s empowerment organization headquartered in Louisville, is bringing its empowerment tour to the state of Kentucky.

Sponsored by Passport, the Power to Exhale tour will partner with community, education, and entertainment providers in various communities around the Commonwealth.

“This will be an RV empowerment tour rolling from city to city to give people in the community everything from information on controlling their blood pressure to a road map on how to live your best life,” said Power to Exhale Founder Charla Young. “We will also stop to build a Habitat for Humanity Home, volunteer at Dare to Care of Louisville and stand proudly on the platform of empowerment as we march through a community parade. This RV Tour will be All Things Empowerment.”

The RV Tour kicks off Saturday, September 1, at the Big Four Bridge in Downtown Louisville, where more than 200 Power to Exhale members will gather to walk with a platform solidarity, sisterhood and service. Other stops will include Lexington, Bowling Green, Radcliff/Elizabethtown, and Covington. Every stop is free and open to the public.

To see the full list of stops, please click here.

For more information, please contact Charla Young at exhalequestions@gmail.com or by calling (502) 938-9454, or go online to powertoexhale.org.

 

Attorney General seeks help to create a logo for Kentucky’s Human Trafficking Task Force

Part of combating human trafficking around Kentucky is helping residents understand how to identify trafficking victims and report the crime, according to Attorney General Andy Beshear. As part of this educational effort, his office is launching an initiative with state and local partners to help raise awareness of human trafficking – whose victims, according to Beshear, are often the most vulnerable in Kentucky’s communities. The initiative calls on high school juniors and seniors, and all college students to create a logo for Kentucky’s Human Trafficking Task Force, which Beshear’s office and Catholic Charities of Louisville co-chair.

“Human trafficking is a growing and gruesome crime in the Commonwealth and in order to combat it, we need the help of every community to recognize what it is and to report it,” Beshear said. “Our logo initiative not only engages young adults to help us further promote awareness through our task force, but also teaches them that victims of human trafficking are often the most vulnerable in our communities – victims of abuse and violence, runaways, refugees, immigrants or those who are homeless.”

Amy Nace-DeGonda, with Catholic Charities of Louisville, said the purpose of the logo is to support the anti-human trafficking movement in Kentucky.

“Both adults and children can be coerced into sex or labor trafficking and awareness of this is key,” Nace-DeGonda said. “With raised awareness of what trafficking is, the indicators of trafficking, prevention can occur as well as those who have been trafficked can reach needed services. I appreciate this effort being done throughout the state.”

In promoting the logo initiative, the attorney general’s office and Catholic Charities of Louisville are joined by Free2Hope, Women of the Well Ministries, the Kristy Love Foundation, and the University of Louisville Kent School of Social Work.

The deadline to submit a logo is Oct. 8. For more details go to www.ag.ky.gov.

Beshear said it is the law to report any suspected case of child trafficking, and that everyone has a role to play in preventing human trafficking:

  • If a human trafficking victim is in immediate danger, dial 911.
  • To report suspected human trafficking of a child, call 877-KYSAFE1 (877-597-2331).
  • Victims of human trafficking may also call the National Human Trafficking hotline at 888-373-7888 or text BEFREE. Interpreters are available.