Commitment to Compassion Luncheon to Honor 7 who Make a Difference in Healthcare

Compassionate LouisvilleTechnical competency is imperative in the healthcare industry. But just as important are the people who can demonstrate the virtues of compassion.

Healthcare professionals who go above and beyond their job duties to extend kindness and compassion to their patients, their colleagues and the broader community usually do so under the radar. That is, they don’t do it for the attention.

But that doesn’t mean they don’t deserve the attention. We want to celebrate compassion and formally recognize and celebrate the dedicated folks in the healthcare community who demonstrate compassion on a day-to-day and person-by-person basis. We do this with the Commitment to Compassion luncheon.

Created by Passport Health Plan and the Healthcare Constellation of Compassionate Louisville three years ago, and supported by Insider Louisville, the annual luncheon continues to grow and put a spotlight on the countless compassionate caregivers in our community.

For more information or to RSVP for this year’s event on February 28, please click here.

 

Federal Government Officially Approves Kentucky HEALTH Program for Medicaid Members

KY Health NoticeAs you may have heard, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has officially approved Kentucky’s 1115 Waiver, allowing for the official creation of the Kentucky HEALTH program for certain low-income adults and their families.

The word HEALTH stands for “Helping to Engage and Achieve Long Term Health.” The goal of the program is to offer each beneficiary the ability to customize a path based on individual needs that will lead to better health, engagement in their communities, improved employability, and success through long-term independence.

Passport will be working on many more detailed communications in the coming weeks and months to help our members and providers navigate this transition. In the meantime, everyone is encouraged to review the official state website devoted to Kentucky HEALTH, which includes an overview video, FAQs, and more, online at kentuckyhealth.ky.gov.

Passport will continue to work with the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) and our extensive provider network to operationalize the Kentucky HEALTH program. We will be working with all of our members and the providers in our network to help them understand the changes that will be coming over the next few months. We also encourage all Kentucky Medicaid members to make sure that their address is correct with DMS to ensure that they receive all important communications leading up to the official start of the Kentucky HEALTH program on July 1.

 

Holidays Can Bring About Serious Depression for Some, But There Are Ways to Combat It

Insider Louisville LogoIt may seem like the merriest time of the year, but the holidays can prime the pump of depression for many people. And it’s especially difficult once the Christmas tree comes down, the pressures of the workplace return, and the bills start coming in.

It’s a time when many people are especially susceptible to falling into poor eating and drinking habits, not getting enough sleep, and neglecting exercise. It can all be overwhelming, no matter who you are.

Gloria Berry, a licensed family therapist at Centerstone Kentucky, acknowledges that overspending on Christmas presents is a trigger for January blues, but she offers some good advice to help people cope with the pressures that come after the holidays.

“People may have budgeted, but didn’t stick to it, or they overextended themselves,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “ ‘How am I going to pay my rent, pay for food for me and my family, pay for electricity and water and pay off these credit cards?’ I’ve heard many families that I’ve worked with talk about paying throughout the year to pay off Christmas. I try to encourage families to plan ahead and budget ahead — (think about) how much they want to spend so they can save for that throughout the year so they don’t get back in this cycle of feeling anxious and stressed after the holidays.”

For a video with more information, please click here.

 

Nominate Someone for the 2018 Commitment to Compassion Luncheon Today

Compassionate LouisvilleFor the honorees at the 2017 Commitment to Compassion luncheon, which took place at the Muhammad Ali Center in February, performing compassionate acts for others is a natural act.

No one had to ask any of them to go above and beyond what was expected. They didn’t ask for extra compensation, and every one of them was shocked and surprised to win an award for showing compassion as part of their work in health care. To read more about the 2017 recipients, please click here.

The Commitment to Compassion Luncheon is held to shine a light on those who exemplify true compassion in healthcare delivery and make a difference in the lives of others. The 2018 luncheon will be on Wednesday, February 28. Sponsors for this event include Passport Health Plan, Insider Louisville, and the Compassionate Louisville Healthcare Constellation.

If you have a hero for compassion in your life, please nominate them here.

 

 

Many Men Have a Hard Time Talking About Depression, Especially Around the Holidays

Insider Louisville LogoWhile most people associate the holidays with happiness, it can also be an especially challenging time for those suffering from depression. And an often-overlooked segment of society dealing with depression is middle-aged men.

The worst outcome for depression, of course, is suicide. In the U.S., white males commit suicide at a rate more than double that of any other group, and more men age 45-54 are victims than any other age ranges.

Dr. Jesse Wright, director of the University of Louisville Depression Center, said there are many reasons men don’t get the help they need.

“For some reason men seem to have a harder time talking about it, identifying that they have it and getting help,” Wright said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “We’ve seen right here in Louisville some terrible tragedies, even physicians that know about depression, know that help works, but for one reason or another didn’t get that help and ended up as a suicide.

“In men, depression is often a silent killer. If it doesn’t kill, it’s a silent damager, to their careers, to their relationships with their family, to their own personal health.”

To see a video of Dr. Wright speaking more about this issue, please click here.

 

Third Annual Commitment to Compassion Luncheon Coming Up Soon, and Nominees Are Still Needed

Compassionate LouisvilleIf you were to search the city for people who exhibit compassion in their daily lives, you would find them everywhere you go and in all walks of life. The dictionary definition is “sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.”

Simple acts like holding a door open, volunteering to tutor a child, or helping someone with a disability are second-nature to many Louisvillians. After all, we branded ourselves “Compassionate City” six years ago, and prove it every year with an entire week of service in which individuals volunteer to work on projects that improve the community.

Last February, the second annual Commitment to Compassion luncheon took place at the Muhammad Ali Center. Six individuals were honored for their extraordinary commitment to living a compassionate life in the health care field. To read more about two of the honorees, please click here.

The next Commitment to Compassion luncheon – sponsored by Passport Health Plan, Compassionate Louisville, and Insider Louisville – is coming up shortly. To nominate someone for an award, please click here.

 

2017 KIDS COUNT County Data Book Details Current Status of Well-Being for Kentucky Children

The 2017 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book offers the latest data on 17 measures of child well-being, showing whether outcomes for children have improved, worsened, or stayed the same over a five-year period. It also offers detailed data for all 120 Kentucky counties, and calculates how many children would be impacted if Kentucky was able to make just a 10 percent improvement for each measure.

“The message behind the KIDS COUNT data is clear: giving children opportunities to succeed is essential if our state is to reach its potential,” said Dr. Terry Brooks, executive director of Kentucky Youth Advocates (KYA). “Looking at data change over time illuminates areas of progress and areas of needed policy change and investment. If all of our kids-no matter their families’ income, skin color, or zip code-are to grow up to be healthy and productive citizens, their needs must be prioritized.”

The 2017 County Data Book allows users to investigate areas in which Kentucky and its counties are making progress and those needing focused attention for improvement by highlighting information and data in four domains of child well-being: economic security, education, health, and family and community.

“Quality data helps us focus our efforts to build healthier and safer communities,” said Mark Carter, CEO of Passport Health Plan, the signature sponsor of the Data Book. “That’s why we are so pleased to sponsor a tool that health provider partners, community agencies, youth, and advocates across Kentucky can utilize to build stronger communities for our future – our children.”

For example, health data continues to show progress for Kentucky kids. Nearly 96 percent of children under age 19 and 77 percent of young adults age 19-25 have health insurance, which they depend on to stay healthy. In addition, rates of smoking during pregnancy, babies born at low birthweight, and teen births all improved over the past 5 years.

Read the 2017 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book and access the Kentucky KIDS COUNT Data Dashboard, featuring data trends from the 2017 report, at  kyyouth.org.

 

Passport joins with Red Cross to ‘Sound the Alarm’ and install free smoke detectors

Passport Health Plan is proud to be a sponsor of the American Red Cross’s “Sound the Alarm” campaign for 2017 and 2018.

The “Sound the Alarm” campaign is a national event that aims to raise awareness and provide free smoke detectors and installation to all people who might need them. Through Passport’s involvement, we hope to increase awareness and provide resources to those who need it across the state of Kentucky.

Louisville, Lexington, and Tompkinsville were among the 100 cities chosen nationwide to be a part of this program. Due to the prevalence of recent natural disasters with hurricanes, storms, flooding, etc., the Red Cross has moved the Louisville and Lexington implementations until Spring 2018.

Residents who are in need of a smoke detector can contact the Red Cross and request someone to come out and install one in their home for free. More information is available online at SoundtheAlarm.org.

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Passport joins with ADA to present ‘Super Saturday’ event in Lexington

ADA-passport-logoPassport and the American Diabetes Association are presenting a special event on Saturday, November 18, in Lexington for residents to come out and learn all about eating better and moving more.

The “Super Saturday” event, which runs from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. and will be at the William Wells Brown Community Center at 548 E. Sixth St. in Lexington, is open to the public and will have information for people with diabetes, people with prediabetes, and people who want to help minimize their risk for getting diabetes.

The event will have speakers to provide education and motivation, opportunities for attendees to participate in chair exercises, and a good sampling of healthy food options. There will also be vendors to visit and an opportunity for a free kidney screening, courtesy of the National Kidney Foundation.

To register for the event, please go online to diabetes.org/supersaturday or call (859) 268-9129.

 

Pediatrician Knows That Social Determinants Can Have a Bigger an Impact on Health Than Just Going to See the Doctor

Insider Louisville LogoThe gap between the life expectancy of babies born in the Smoketown neighborhood of Louisville compared with those born in the St. Matthews area is 15 years. That statistic – from the 2014 Louisville Metro Health Equity Report – helped Dr. Charlotte Gay Stites take action.

In early 2018, the pediatrician expects to open the doors to the Smoketown Family Wellness Center, a place where families can come to improve their health and well-being.

“Most parents have a great understanding of social determinants of health and what the impact those have on the health and well-being of their child,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “Very often, when people come to the pediatric office, they are interested in talking about how their kid is doing in school, how their child is fitting in with their friends. Social determinants of health are a huge piece of health and well-being. They are related to education, income, social connectivity, employment – really the nuts and bolts of people’s lives.”

To read more about what Dr. Stites is doing, please click here.