Third Annual Commitment to Compassion Luncheon Coming Up Soon, and Nominees Are Still Needed

Compassionate LouisvilleIf you were to search the city for people who exhibit compassion in their daily lives, you would find them everywhere you go and in all walks of life. The dictionary definition is “sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others.”

Simple acts like holding a door open, volunteering to tutor a child, or helping someone with a disability are second-nature to many Louisvillians. After all, we branded ourselves “Compassionate City” six years ago, and prove it every year with an entire week of service in which individuals volunteer to work on projects that improve the community.

Last February, the second annual Commitment to Compassion luncheon took place at the Muhammad Ali Center. Six individuals were honored for their extraordinary commitment to living a compassionate life in the health care field. To read more about two of the honorees, please click here.

The next Commitment to Compassion luncheon – sponsored by Passport Health Plan, Compassionate Louisville, and Insider Louisville – is coming up shortly. To nominate someone for an award, please click here.

 

2017 KIDS COUNT County Data Book Details Current Status of Well-Being for Kentucky Children

The 2017 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book offers the latest data on 17 measures of child well-being, showing whether outcomes for children have improved, worsened, or stayed the same over a five-year period. It also offers detailed data for all 120 Kentucky counties, and calculates how many children would be impacted if Kentucky was able to make just a 10 percent improvement for each measure.

“The message behind the KIDS COUNT data is clear: giving children opportunities to succeed is essential if our state is to reach its potential,” said Dr. Terry Brooks, executive director of Kentucky Youth Advocates (KYA). “Looking at data change over time illuminates areas of progress and areas of needed policy change and investment. If all of our kids-no matter their families’ income, skin color, or zip code-are to grow up to be healthy and productive citizens, their needs must be prioritized.”

The 2017 County Data Book allows users to investigate areas in which Kentucky and its counties are making progress and those needing focused attention for improvement by highlighting information and data in four domains of child well-being: economic security, education, health, and family and community.

“Quality data helps us focus our efforts to build healthier and safer communities,” said Mark Carter, CEO of Passport Health Plan, the signature sponsor of the Data Book. “That’s why we are so pleased to sponsor a tool that health provider partners, community agencies, youth, and advocates across Kentucky can utilize to build stronger communities for our future – our children.”

For example, health data continues to show progress for Kentucky kids. Nearly 96 percent of children under age 19 and 77 percent of young adults age 19-25 have health insurance, which they depend on to stay healthy. In addition, rates of smoking during pregnancy, babies born at low birthweight, and teen births all improved over the past 5 years.

Read the 2017 Kentucky KIDS COUNT County Data Book and access the Kentucky KIDS COUNT Data Dashboard, featuring data trends from the 2017 report, at  kyyouth.org.

 

Passport joins with Red Cross to ‘Sound the Alarm’ and install free smoke detectors

Passport Health Plan is proud to be a sponsor of the American Red Cross’s “Sound the Alarm” campaign for 2017 and 2018.

The “Sound the Alarm” campaign is a national event that aims to raise awareness and provide free smoke detectors and installation to all people who might need them. Through Passport’s involvement, we hope to increase awareness and provide resources to those who need it across the state of Kentucky.

Louisville, Lexington, and Tompkinsville were among the 100 cities chosen nationwide to be a part of this program. Due to the prevalence of recent natural disasters with hurricanes, storms, flooding, etc., the Red Cross has moved the Louisville and Lexington implementations until Spring 2018.

Residents who are in need of a smoke detector can contact the Red Cross and request someone to come out and install one in their home for free. More information is available online at SoundtheAlarm.org.

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Passport joins with ADA to present ‘Super Saturday’ event in Lexington

ADA-passport-logoPassport and the American Diabetes Association are presenting a special event on Saturday, November 18, in Lexington for residents to come out and learn all about eating better and moving more.

The “Super Saturday” event, which runs from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. and will be at the William Wells Brown Community Center at 548 E. Sixth St. in Lexington, is open to the public and will have information for people with diabetes, people with prediabetes, and people who want to help minimize their risk for getting diabetes.

The event will have speakers to provide education and motivation, opportunities for attendees to participate in chair exercises, and a good sampling of healthy food options. There will also be vendors to visit and an opportunity for a free kidney screening, courtesy of the National Kidney Foundation.

To register for the event, please go online to diabetes.org/supersaturday or call (859) 268-9129.

 

Pediatrician Knows That Social Determinants Can Have a Bigger an Impact on Health Than Just Going to See the Doctor

Insider Louisville LogoThe gap between the life expectancy of babies born in the Smoketown neighborhood of Louisville compared with those born in the St. Matthews area is 15 years. That statistic – from the 2014 Louisville Metro Health Equity Report – helped Dr. Charlotte Gay Stites take action.

In early 2018, the pediatrician expects to open the doors to the Smoketown Family Wellness Center, a place where families can come to improve their health and well-being.

“Most parents have a great understanding of social determinants of health and what the impact those have on the health and well-being of their child,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “Very often, when people come to the pediatric office, they are interested in talking about how their kid is doing in school, how their child is fitting in with their friends. Social determinants of health are a huge piece of health and well-being. They are related to education, income, social connectivity, employment – really the nuts and bolts of people’s lives.”

To read more about what Dr. Stites is doing, please click here.

 

Passport plans second ‘Community Conversation’ to talk about Health and Well-Being Campus

Well Being Campus LogoPassport Health Plan will be hosting another “Community Conversation” on November 28 to discuss the progress of the Passport Health and Well-Being campus being planned for West Louisville.

The event, which is being co-hosted by the Republic Bank Foundation YMCA, will take place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Chestnut Street Family YMCA, 930 W. Chestnut Street, Louisville. A light meal will be served and free child care will be provided by the YMCA.

During the event, updates will be given about the two major projects in development for the intersection of 18th Street and Broadway – the Passport Health and Well-Being campus and the Republic Bank Foundation YMCA – we’ll review feedback from the June 1 neighborhood meeting, we’ll share how this input has shaped the projects, and we’ll continue gathering input from community members.

There will also be leaders from the Louisville Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) and the Transit Authority of River City (TARC) to provide information on happenings that are bringing additional programs and services to the surrounding neighborhood.

For more information, please click here. To RSVP for this free event, please click here.

 

Passport sponsors educational symposium for medical professionals to learn more about chronic kidney disease

Passport is sponsoring a live professional education symposium called, “CKDinform: Early Detection and Prevention” for primary care practitioners (PCPs) to learn more about chronic kidney disease (CKD).

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) event takes place on Saturday, November 11, at the Marriott Louisville East, 1903 Embassy Square Blvd., in Louisville.

The 3-hour symposium focuses on the unique role that PCPs play in managing CKD patients. Topics will include the burden of CKD to the population, modifiable CKD risk factors, screening methods, and interpretation of test results. Evidence-based treatment recommendations and management plans for CKD will be presented, and the program will also address the need for timely referral to nephrologists, in addition to the importance of patient education and counseling.

It  is designed for physicians (primary care, cardiologists, endocrinologists), nurses, advanced practitioners, and other clinicians who care for people with CKD.

Attendees at the event will earn up to 3.0 continuing medical education/continuing education (CME/CE) credits/contact hours. Registration in advance is $25; registration at the door will be $30.

For more information, please click here.

 

Louisville Health Care Community Celebrates Acts of Compassion

Insider Louisville LogoActs of compassion are being committed daily in Louisville in all walks of life. There aren’t many cities that celebrate compassion with a full week of giving every year, with Mayor Greg Fischer encouraging community members to give thousands of hours to performing acts of compassion to improve our community.

Those who work in the healthcare community seem to have an extra sense of compassion, with many working to help those who struggle with various challenges in their lives. Two years ago, the first luncheon was held to shine a light on those who make a difference in the lives of others, sponsored by Passport Health Plan, Insider Louisville, and the Compassionate Louisville Healthcare Constellation.

For a closer look at two of the honorees from the 2017 event, please click here

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Keisha Deonarine named Executive Director of Passport Foundation

KeishaKeisha Deonarine has been named Executive Director of the Passport Foundation.

She joins Passport with a background in banking, economic development, fundraising, and community development. She most recently served as the Senior Community Health Director for the American Heart Association; prior to that, she was the Economic Development Manager for Louisville Forward, the economic and community branch of Metro Louisville government.

“Keisha has a proven track record, securing development funds for Metro Louisville,” said Passport CEO Mark B. Carter. “We are very excited to have her join our team during this time of transformational opportunity within the communities we serve.”

The Passport Foundation will seek philanthropic support to fuel innovation that positively impacts the social determinants of health and promotes health equity, with a special focus on marginalized populations across Kentucky. An initial focus for the Foundation is securing support for creation of the Health and Well-being Campus in West Louisville. Philanthropy will help build this world-class campus, which will serve as a model of collaboration to build a healthy community where everyone has the opportunity to flourish.

For more information, please click here.

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Breast Cancer Survivor Learns That every Day Matters

Insider Louisville LogoIt’s one of those statistics that is hard to imagine — 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Most Americans know someone whose life has been affected by the disease, and the support they’ve shown is encouraging — from the thousands of local fundraisers held this month to the prevalence of pink on everything from ribbons to NFL uniforms.

While breast cancer remains the second-leading cause of death among women, survival rates have increased, thanks to early detection and treatment improvements. Today, in America, 3 million women count themselves as breast cancer survivors. One of them is Sarah Gorman of Louisville, who was diagnosed seven years ago and has emerged from her cancer journey with her positive outlook intact.

“I’m doing everything I can, I’m living life,” she says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “I often said at the end of that whole experience that I could have written a book titled ‘How cancer was the best thing that ever happened to me.’ People came out of the woodwork with cards and flowers and I had no idea all those people even cared. I get goose bumps now even talking about it.”

For more information, please click here.