Commitment to Compassion Luncheon Recognizes Those Who Extend Consideration in Their Work and Lives

Insider Louisville LogoLouisville is fortunate to have individuals who bring a compassionate attitude to their work, people who inspire others to extend consideration and kindness in the way they go about their lives.

The city is also fortunate to see that some of those compassionate champions are recognized, thanks to the annual “Commitment to Compassion” luncheon. The second annual event took place at the Muhammad Ali Center in February, honoring six individuals and an organization.

The event, which will be celebrated again in 2018, is sponsored by Passport Health Plan, Compassionate Louisville, and Insider Louisville.

To read about two of the women who were honored in 2017 – Betty “BJ” Adkins and Lisa Benner – please click here.

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Passport hosts Cancer Prevention and Care forum on Saturday in West Louisville

Passport Health Plan is hosting a Cancer Prevention and Care forum on Saturday, September 23, at St. Stephen Church in West Louisville.

The forum, which is free and open to the public, will include information about the importance of having a strong relationship with your doctor and information on smoking, as well as a number of free services:

  • Blood pressure readings
  • Kidney screenings
  • Vision screenings
  • Diabetes screenings
  • Flu shots
  • And more!

The forum will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the St. Stephen Church Family Life Center, 1508 West Kentucky Street, Louisville, KY 40210. For more information, please click here.

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Passport joins with American Diabetes Association to help kids eat healthier

ADA-passport-logoPassport Health Plan and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have created a “Healthy Habits” placemat to help kids understand what they should be eating at school and home to live healthier lives.

The placemats, which are available here, will be shared at schools all across the Commonwealth this month in advance of National Healthy Lunch Day, which takes place on Tuesday, September 19.

According to the ADA, there is lots of confusion about what to eat, including what’s healthful and what’s not. Often the food choices people make are full of calories yet lack the nutritional value the body needs. The result is expanding waistlines, low energy and rising rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity-related illnesses.

The goal of Healthy Lunch Day is to help inspire, encourage and empower people of all ages to eat healthy lunches as much as possible.

 

Healthy Hoops Kentucky helps bring hope to kids with asthma through doctors, basketball

No child wants to be on the sidelines during play time. However, it’s an unfortunate fact that children with asthma must often sit idly by while their friends run around.

Countless local kids with asthma have benefited from an annual program that offers support, education, and fun for a decade now. The 10th annual Healthy Hoops Kentucky event will take place at Central High School on Saturday, Sept. 9. The free event is open to any family with a child aged 7-14 who has asthma. You can sign up online or call (502) 585-8429.

Doctors, nurses, and other health professionals volunteer their time to provide information and education to families, and the kids love it – in part because of the presence of Louisville’s Doctor of Dunk, Darrell Griffith.

“Over a 10-year period, I’ve seen a lot of success stories,” Griffith said in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “The idea of educating parents, and brother and sisters, has been a really, really great program for the community. It gives the kids hope that they can participate, and be normal, because sometimes when you have asthma you don’t think you’re normal, especially at a young age.”

 

Healthy Hoops Kentucky to celebrate 10th annual event at a new location: Central High School

Healthy Hoops Kentucky is an event where asthmatic children and their families can learn more about having asthma and other asthma-related conditions, in addition to learning some great ways to get exercise and stay healthy with Louisville basketball legend Darrell Griffith!

Healthy Hoops Kentucky is FREE for all asthmatic children ages 7 to 14 and their families. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 9, and will be held at a new location this year: Central High School, 1130 West Chestnut Street. Families can register by going online to healthyhoopsky.com or by calling (502) 585-8429.

Event features include:

  • In the morning, children and their families will receive a comprehensive clinical screening to evaluate their asthma, a free consultation with an asthma health professional, and nutrition counseling. They will also learn how to lead active lives while managing their breathing, how to use medications appropriately, how to monitor exercise, and how to keep asthma under control. Each family will leave the screening with an “Asthma Action Plan” and tools to keep their asthma under control.
  • Then, after a free lunch, the children will head to the basketball court, where on-court legend Darrell Griffith will lead a team of celebrity basketball coaches in a series of workshops designed to teach the children how they can play the game even if they have breathing issues.

“I’m so excited to be involved in the Healthy Hoops Kentucky event to help these kids and their families,” said Griffith. “The work that we do to help these young people manage their asthma and learn how they can stay physically active has changed their lives.”

Healthy Hoops Kentucky is sponsored by Passport Health Plan, the University of Louisville, the AmeriHealth Caritas Partnership, the American Lung Association, and other local organizations. It is not a requirement to be a Passport Health Plan member to participate in Healthy Hoops Kentucky. For more information, please click here.

 

Cedar Lake honored at ‘A Commitment to Compassion’ luncheon

Compassionate LouisvillePassport Health Plan, Compassionate Louisville, and Insider Louisville celebrate inspiring individuals and organizations in healthcare annually through “A Commitment to Compassion,” a luncheon that shines a light on those who embody compassion and make a difference in the lives of others every day.

As we prepare for the 2018 luncheon, we wanted to take a look back at the six people and one organization honored at the 2017 event.

Cedar Lake, a private not-for-profit organization, activates its commitment to compassion through its support of more than 200 of our neighbors with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The faith-based organization was founded in 1970 by Louisville-area parents of people with intellectual disabilities. For more information, please click here or go online to cedarlake.org.

 

Kentucky Cabinet provides updated information about KY HEALTH program

KY Health NoticeWe are still waiting for official word from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) about Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin’s Section 1115 waiver application proposal, known as KY HEALTH (Helping to Engage and Achieve Long Term Health).

In the meantime, the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) Department for Medicaid Services (DMS) has produced a “Kentucky HEALTH Quick Facts”one-pager for all Kentuckians. It is available online on the Kentucky HEALTH website under “additional information.” Also available online is the updated Kentucky HEALTH Overview Presentation and a quick reference Kentucky HEALTH Eligibility Summary.

 

 

Parents & teachers ‘have to be more vigilant’ to prevent bullying in schools and online

Insider Louisville LogoFor a significant number of school-age children, heading back to school is a happy time of reuniting with friends, meeting new teachers, and adopting new routines. But for an unfortunate few, it also means coming face-to-face with a most unwelcome sight – the bully.

Dr. Terry Scott is Director of the Center for Instructional and Behavioral Research in Schools at the University of Louisville’s Department of Special Education. He says that bullying in schools may not be more prevalent than it used to be, but social media provides more opportunities for bullies to do damage these days.

“What we’ve found is that if you simply go into a school and tell kids to stop bullying, the bullying tends to go underground,” he says in a Passport-sponsored article on Insider Louisville. “And cyber-bullying is a great place for it to go underground because adults aren’t seeing every exchange the kids have.”